Tag Archives: medium format

Phase One IQ3 100MP Trichromatic vs Standard Back Linear Color, Part II

We have seen in the last post that Phase One apparently performed a couple of main tweaks to the Color Filter Array of its Medium Format IQ3 100MP back when it introduced the Trichromatic:  it made the shapes of color filter sensitivities more symmetric by eliminating residual transmittance away from the peaks; and it boosted the peak sensitivity of the red (and possibly blue) filter.  It did this with the objective of obtaining more accurate, less noisy color out of the hardware, requiring less processing and weaker purple fringing to boot.

Both changes carry the compromises discussed in the last article so the purpose of this one and the one that follows is to attempt to measure – within the limits of my tests, procedures and understanding[1] – the effect of the CFA changes from similar raw captures by the IQ3 100MP Standard Back and Trichromatic, courtesy of David Chew.  We will concentrate on color accuracy, leaving purple fringing for another time.

Figure 1. Phase One IQ3 100MP image rendered linearly via a dedicated color matrix from raw data without any additional processing whatsoever: no color corrections, no tone curve, no sharpening, no nothing. Brightness adjusted to just avoid clipping.  Capture by David Chew.

Continue reading Phase One IQ3 100MP Trichromatic vs Standard Back Linear Color, Part II

Phase One IQ3 100MP Trichromatic vs Standard Back Linear Color, Part I

It is always interesting when innovative companies push the envelope of the state-of-the-art of a single component in their systems because a lot can be learned from before and after comparisons.   I was therefore excited when Phase One introduced a Trichromatic version of their Medium Format IQ3 100MP Digital Back last September because it could allows us to isolate the effects of tweaks to their Bayer Color Filter Array, assuming all else stays the same.

Figure 1. IQ3 100MP Trichromatic (left) vs the rest (right), from PhaseOne.com.   Units are not specified but one would assume that the vertical axis is relative spectral sensitivity and the horizontal axis represents wavelength.

Thanks to two virtually identical captures by David Chew at getDPI, and Erik Kaffehr’s intelligent questions at DPR, in the following articles I will explore the effect on linear color of the new Trichromatic CFA (TC) vs the old one on the Standard Back (SB).  In the process we will discover that – within the limits of my tests, procedures and understanding[1] – the Standard Back produces apparently more ‘accurate’ color while the Trichromatic produces better looking matrices, potentially resulting in ‘purer’ signals. Continue reading Phase One IQ3 100MP Trichromatic vs Standard Back Linear Color, Part I

Taking the Sharpness Model for a Spin – II

This post  will continue looking at the spatial frequency response measured by MTF Mapper off slanted edges in DPReview.com raw captures and relative fits by the ‘sharpness’ model discussed in the last few articles.  The model takes the physical parameters of the digital camera and lens as inputs and produces theoretical directional system MTF curves comparable to measured data.  As we will see the model seems to be able to simulate these systems well – at least within this limited set of parameters.

The following fits refer to the green channel of a number of interchangeable lens digital camera systems with different lenses, pixel sizes and formats – from the current Medium Format 100MP champ to the 1/2.3″ 18MP sensor size also sometimes found in the best smartphones.  Here is the roster with the cameras as set up:

table-1-testing-model
Table 1. The cameras and lenses under test.

Continue reading Taking the Sharpness Model for a Spin – II

Are micro Four Thirds Lenses Typically Twice as ‘Sharp’ as Full Frame’s?

In fact the question is more generic than that.   Smaller format lens designers try to compensate for their imaging system geometric resolution penalty  (compared to a larger format when viewing final images at the same size) by designing ‘sharper’ lenses specifically for it, rather than recycling larger formats’ designs (feeling guilty APS-C?) – sometimes with excellent effect.   Are they succeeding?   I will use mFT only as an example here, but input is welcome for all formats, from phones to large format.

Continue reading Are micro Four Thirds Lenses Typically Twice as ‘Sharp’ as Full Frame’s?