Tag Archives: slanted edge

Taking the Sharpness Model for a Spin

The series of articles starting here outlines a model of how the various physical components of a digital camera and lens can affect the ‘sharpness’ – that is the spatial resolution – of the  images captured in the raw data.  In this one we will pit the model against MTF curves obtained through the slanted edge method[1] from real world raw captures both with and without an anti-aliasing filter.

With a few simplifying assumptions, which include ignoring aliasing and phase, the spatial frequency response (SFR or MTF) of a photographic digital imaging system near the center can be expressed as the product of the Modulation Transfer Function of each component in it.  For a current digital camera these would typically be the main ones:

(1)   \begin{equation*} MTF_{sys} = MTF_{lens} (\cdot MTF_{AA}) \cdot MTF_{pixel} \end{equation*}

all in two dimensions Continue reading Taking the Sharpness Model for a Spin

Combining Bayer CFA Modulation Transfer Functions – I

This is a vast and complex subject for which I do not have formal training.  In this and the following article I will discuss my thoughts on how MTF50 results obtained from  raw data of the four Bayer CFA color channels off  a neutral target captured with a typical camera through the slanted edge method can be combined to provide a meaningful composite MTF50 for the imaging system as a whole.   The perimeter are neutral slanted edge measurements of Bayer CFA raw data for linear spatial resolution  (‘sharpness’) photographic hardware evaluations.  Corrections, suggestions and challenges are welcome. Continue reading Combining Bayer CFA Modulation Transfer Functions – I

The Slanted Edge Method

My preferred method for measuring the spatial resolution performance of photographic equipment these days is the slanted edge method.  It requires a minimum amount of additional effort compared to capturing and simply eye-balling a pinch, Siemens or other chart but it gives immensely more, useful, accurate, absolute information in the language and units that have been used to characterize optical systems for over a century: it produces a good approximation to  the Modulation Transfer Function of the two dimensional Point Spread Function of the camera/lens system in the direction perpendicular to the edge.

Much of what there is to know about a system’s spatial resolution performance can be deduced by analyzing such a curve, starting from the perceptually relevant MTF50 metric, discussed a while back.  And all of this simply from capturing the image of a black and white slanted edge, which one can easily produce and print at home.

Continue reading The Slanted Edge Method

How Sharp are my Camera and Lens?

You want to measure how sharp your camera/lens combination is to make sure it lives up to its specs.  Or perhaps you’d like to compare how well one lens captures spatial resolution compared to another  you own.  Or perhaps again you are in the market for new equipment and would like to know what could be expected from the shortlist.  Or an old faithful is not looking right and you’d like to check it out.   So you decide to do some testing.  Where to start? Continue reading How Sharp are my Camera and Lens?